Wasserstein Control of Mirror Langevin Monte Carlo

Kelvin Shuangjian Zhang, Gabriel Peyré, Jalal Fadili, Marcelo Pereyra
; Proceedings of Thirty Third Conference on Learning Theory, PMLR 125:3814-3841, 2020.

Abstract

Discretized Langevin diffusions are efficient Monte Carlo methods for sampling from high dimensional target densities that are log-Lipschitz-smooth and (strongly) log-concave. In particular, the Euclidean Langevin Monte Carlo sampling algorithm has received much attention lately, leading to a detailed understanding of its non-asymptotic convergence properties and of the role that smoothness and log-concavity play in the convergence rate. Distributions that do not possess these regularity properties can be addressed by considering a Riemannian Langevin diffusion with a metric capturing the local geometry of the log-density. However, the Monte Carlo algorithms derived from discretizations of such Riemannian Langevin diffusions are notoriously difficult to analyze. In this paper, we consider Langevin diffusions on a Hessian-type manifold and study a discretization that is closely related to the mirror-descent scheme. We establish for the first time a non-asymptotic upper-bound on the sampling error of the resulting Hessian Riemannian Langevin Monte Carlo algorithm. This bound is measured according to a Wasserstein distance induced by a Riemannian metric ground cost capturing the squared Hessian structure and closely related to a self-concordance-like condition. The upper-bound implies, for instance, that the iterates contract toward a Wasserstein ball around the target density whose radius is made explicit. Our theory recovers existing Euclidean results and can cope with a wide variety of Hessian metrics related to highly non-flat geometries.

Cite this Paper


BibTeX
@InProceedings{pmlr-v125-zhang20a, title = {Wasserstein Control of Mirror Langevin Monte Carlo}, author = {Zhang, Kelvin Shuangjian and Peyr\'e, Gabriel and Fadili, Jalal and Pereyra, Marcelo}, pages = {3814--3841}, year = {2020}, editor = {Jacob Abernethy and Shivani Agarwal}, volume = {125}, series = {Proceedings of Machine Learning Research}, address = {}, month = {09--12 Jul}, publisher = {PMLR}, pdf = {http://proceedings.mlr.press/v125/zhang20a/zhang20a.pdf}, url = {http://proceedings.mlr.press/v125/zhang20a.html}, abstract = { Discretized Langevin diffusions are efficient Monte Carlo methods for sampling from high dimensional target densities that are log-Lipschitz-smooth and (strongly) log-concave. In particular, the Euclidean Langevin Monte Carlo sampling algorithm has received much attention lately, leading to a detailed understanding of its non-asymptotic convergence properties and of the role that smoothness and log-concavity play in the convergence rate. Distributions that do not possess these regularity properties can be addressed by considering a Riemannian Langevin diffusion with a metric capturing the local geometry of the log-density. However, the Monte Carlo algorithms derived from discretizations of such Riemannian Langevin diffusions are notoriously difficult to analyze. In this paper, we consider Langevin diffusions on a Hessian-type manifold and study a discretization that is closely related to the mirror-descent scheme. We establish for the first time a non-asymptotic upper-bound on the sampling error of the resulting Hessian Riemannian Langevin Monte Carlo algorithm. This bound is measured according to a Wasserstein distance induced by a Riemannian metric ground cost capturing the squared Hessian structure and closely related to a self-concordance-like condition. The upper-bound implies, for instance, that the iterates contract toward a Wasserstein ball around the target density whose radius is made explicit. Our theory recovers existing Euclidean results and can cope with a wide variety of Hessian metrics related to highly non-flat geometries. } }
Endnote
%0 Conference Paper %T Wasserstein Control of Mirror Langevin Monte Carlo %A Kelvin Shuangjian Zhang %A Gabriel Peyré %A Jalal Fadili %A Marcelo Pereyra %B Proceedings of Thirty Third Conference on Learning Theory %C Proceedings of Machine Learning Research %D 2020 %E Jacob Abernethy %E Shivani Agarwal %F pmlr-v125-zhang20a %I PMLR %J Proceedings of Machine Learning Research %P 3814--3841 %U http://proceedings.mlr.press %V 125 %W PMLR %X Discretized Langevin diffusions are efficient Monte Carlo methods for sampling from high dimensional target densities that are log-Lipschitz-smooth and (strongly) log-concave. In particular, the Euclidean Langevin Monte Carlo sampling algorithm has received much attention lately, leading to a detailed understanding of its non-asymptotic convergence properties and of the role that smoothness and log-concavity play in the convergence rate. Distributions that do not possess these regularity properties can be addressed by considering a Riemannian Langevin diffusion with a metric capturing the local geometry of the log-density. However, the Monte Carlo algorithms derived from discretizations of such Riemannian Langevin diffusions are notoriously difficult to analyze. In this paper, we consider Langevin diffusions on a Hessian-type manifold and study a discretization that is closely related to the mirror-descent scheme. We establish for the first time a non-asymptotic upper-bound on the sampling error of the resulting Hessian Riemannian Langevin Monte Carlo algorithm. This bound is measured according to a Wasserstein distance induced by a Riemannian metric ground cost capturing the squared Hessian structure and closely related to a self-concordance-like condition. The upper-bound implies, for instance, that the iterates contract toward a Wasserstein ball around the target density whose radius is made explicit. Our theory recovers existing Euclidean results and can cope with a wide variety of Hessian metrics related to highly non-flat geometries.
APA
Zhang, K.S., Peyré, G., Fadili, J. & Pereyra, M.. (2020). Wasserstein Control of Mirror Langevin Monte Carlo. Proceedings of Thirty Third Conference on Learning Theory, in PMLR 125:3814-3841

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